Is this frame a lost cause or can it be salvaged? A look at frame repairs.

Contributions from various community members

This builder made a mistake of cutting down the slide buffer stops. Is this frame trash or can it be fixed?

The post isn’t an issue. It will still run. Go to the shop get the diamond straights - then the yellow diamond kit & the green polishers. Lay the channel area upside down in a tray of water overnight before you go with the diamond and greens - help you get rid of all that fraying.


Channel needs more work... Red marked area, diamond straights on those walls - diamond ball bits along the bottom - then green polish that entire area. Become a Channel Master


So, I tried using the fret cutters to clip a bit from the channel, like in one of MGB’s videos. Resulting plastic tabs deformed a bit, away from the cut.

Straighten that right out my friend. Put the front locking block in and then finish the job. You are bending where the raised posts go above the frame. That will not affect the function - matter of fact - countless freedom protectors accidentally cut the top portions of then off and it still runs without issue brother 👊


A member shares his experience: On my last build I attempted to use my fret cutters on the channel and it flexed that post so much it cracked it. I tried to repair but it broke off. I have probably 500-ish rounds with no issues at all.

The raised posts are a duplicate of Glock - on a Glock they act as and interior guide on the inside of the slide to align it to the Glock rails. On a P80 they aren’t as necessary because P80 combines the locking block with a set of front rails that are 3 times the size of Glock rails. You’ll be fine my friend - I’ve seen it literally 100 times without issues 👍

Slide is catching not racking smooth, what could be the problem?

Get a First Time Quality Channel: Go Pro or become a Channel Master

The recoil spring maybe catching on the channel. Put your block in and use it as a guide. A member shows his for an example.

Guide-rod channel. Too rough (unpolished), too narrow (under-cut)or too shallow (undercut). Make sure your channel is CLEAN. That spring needs a lot of room to move, or it will drag that slide's action to a stop. Be sure the cut-out brings the 'posts' even with the inside of the locking-block, and level to the rear section of the channel. Smooth finish is essential. This was probably the most common problem, and easiest to fix.



Watched the videos. Perfect Pins & Pin Jedi Master

But, Not First Time Quality Pin Holes. Is this repairable?

Short answer- Yes

1) A member writes: My tried and true method for fixing holes. Tape both sides of the hole but only putting a drill bit sized hole on the outside preventing excess JB weld getting on the frame. The inside tape prevents JB weld getting on the inside of the frame. Wait a few days and re-drill. I buy the highest strength weld, works like a charm.

2) Another recommends: I would say some JB weld and some of the finer dust made from the Polymer Tabs. I literally just had a similar issue when drilling out my trigger for a poly AR lower. JB weld and some dust made a great patch. Then just drill. It may not be beautiful... The black poly did show a slight discoloration grey after JB weld patch. But it worked out great. You don't have anything to lose besides a cosmetic blemish after you repair. I know we all came here for MGBs first time quality. But I'm a realist, and I know I'll make small errors as I go. Which is fine because that's how we learn and get better.


More on Frame repair...

Cut Frame ? Not a Problem my Friends.


Put it back together soldering with the tabs, baking soda & super glue.


Yes that's right..... here it is.


Super Glue & Baking Soda method

The repaired area is immediately ready to be sanded, polished or drilled.

A strong repair for pin holes or gouges with no prep work or waiting required. This cocktail adheres to nearly anything.

Place baking soda on work surface, add paint to match frame color.

Mix together, add more B.Soda as needed to make a stiff paste. Let dry, then crumble into a fine dust.



Repair a hole that is not First Time Quality

Install backing on the hole, so repair will not be proud or need very little smoothing, inside of frame. Most any tape will work fine. Ensure it is firmly pressed on. Add a very small amount of colored B.soda to hole. Add a drop of super glue. Tamp it in gently against the tape. Add more glue totally filling hole. Add B. soda to glue, over flow into a small pile above the hole. Tamp then brush off the excess. The area is now ready for First Time Quality sanding & polishing. Pop the frame back in the jig, drill your pin hole again.


Epoxy method

The repaired area has various working times before it's ready for First Time Quality sanding, polish or drilling. A fairly strong repair for pin holes or gouges in your frame if properly prepared. Prep work required: Roughing up then cleaning the area with alcohol or acetone is strongly recommended. Epoxy needs an anchor tooth to grab onto for holding power. Again, install tape backing inside to keep inside of frame smooth(ish).


Tips:

  • Over fill the hole to allow for shrinkage.

  • Putty state defined: after working time has elapsed and before cure time has expired. Epoxy should feel and be moldable like hard putty.

  • While epoxy is still in a putty state, use a razor knife to cut the repair flush with frame, inside & out,

  • Use acetone to shape, smooth and clean the repaired area while in a putty state.

  • Liquid 2 part liquid epoxy is stronger than moldable stick epoxy.

  • Moldable stick epoxies can be used to modify the frame and grip. Custom mold to your hand before coating the frame with your choice of product (Links ▶️ cerakote, duracote, dipping, silicon carbide)

Few product ideas. PC, JB weld, Gorilla and others are competitive brands. They all do about the same thing. Its like buying a slide some like H.A.D., P80 Builder, MDX, Glock OEM, etc...everyone has a fav.

Some epoxy may be colored to match item


Repair a gouge or a pin hole that isn't First Time Quality